Time to Meet at the Pods

Posted: August 31, 2014 in Uncategorized
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Chrono” by Rémi Dubot – Own work.  Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Chrono.svgI stopped listening to Bay Area radio after Frosty left the airwaves.  Someone informed me that John Rothmann and Ed Baxter, along with some other rotating hosts, have been filling Frosty’s time slot on Talk 910am.  Real hosts, not those two guys who supposedly filled in the week following Frosty’s departure.  That was when I stopped listening altogether.  If John and Ed show up, maybe I’ll turn on the radio that now sits on my desk and collects dust.  Definitely will not listen to Gil’s show on Fridays.  I’ve heard from people that the shrieking voice of his wife is still shrieking and interrupting and speaking agonizingly slow to try not to screech.  umm, maybe for two minutes but she can’t turn it off.

I can.  With a click.  But I haven’t bothered to even turn the radio on lately.

I’ve heard from other former KGO listeners that John Rothmann and Ed Baxter are broadcasting from The Talk Pod and promoting it on-air.  I found the site and here’s the link to it:

http://thetalkpod.com/

Also, Rothmann recorded a piece about Ronn Owens.  I haven’t listened to it, yet, but here’s the link:

http://thetalkpod.com/john-rothmann-ronn-owens-profile-courage/

I see, also, The Talk Pod includes podcasts from Lloyd Lindsay Young, Stan Burford, Ed & Rosie, and Barbara Simpson, among others.  My security settings block the audio player but that can be corrected easily.  I’ll certainly try listening to some of these podcasts on Fridays.

For the past few weeks, I’ve been listening to This American Life and Radiolab:

http://www.thisamericanlife.org/

http://www.radiolab.org/

They are fine for awhile, interesting stories with good production values.  But, it’s nice to have a variety of voices and guests to hear, as well as current news every so often without having to flip over to another site.  So, I thought, what else can I try?  Why not music?

I decided on YouTube.  On Friday, I’d stayed late at the office to finish projects that could not wait until Tuesday and I thought music would help to take my mind off the time.  In the past, I’ve enjoyed the segments on BBC Radio 2 when Simon Mayo (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00p2dfq) takes requests for long-plays.  It is so wonderful to hear those old songs in their full five (or more) minutes.

Mayo introduced this series as well, on the top 100 guitar riffs, and this article lists the results: http://www.vintagevinylnews.com/2014/08/bbc-radio-2-listeners-pick-all-time.html

But I wanted something more.  I would one-up Mayo and go the full album route.  yep.  He’s got the Mayo but I’ve got the meat.  Not just a bite, but the full, freakin’ meal.

When I typed in full album on YouTube, I was amazed at all of the choices.  Old albums, new albums, obscure albums, cover albums, it’s all there.  I even saw one I haven’t seen for decades – Richard Harris’ album, Slides, but it’s split into separate YouTube video tracks, so you have to click each song to hear the entire thing.  That album was old when I was young.  I remember hearing it on my next door neighbor’s turntable.  It always skipped near the end of ‘Sunny-Jo’.

I’ve always loved listening to the voice of Richard Harris on Slides:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdJvXcRlylg

But that was not my choice on Friday.  I settled on The Moody Blues’ album, Days of Future Passed.   As I listened, I realized I’ve never heard this Moody Blues album in its entirety.  Oh sure, I’ve heard the songs on the radio but I haven’t listened, really listened, to the full album.  What a different experience than clicking and flipping one song, then another, and another completely different.  To sit through an hour of one cohesive compilation was both refreshing and nostalgic.

Maybe that’s how we’ll remember talk radio decades from now.  Streamed from an audio sharing service we’ll hear those familiar talk radio voices of our youth and think of the good ol’ days when people actually called to voice their opinions and the talk radio hosts listened and engaged conversation.

It really is only a memory now, isn’t it?

 

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